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Citrus-Cured Salmon

Citrus-Cured Salmon

This 24-hour method will transform uncooked salmon into a side of firm, silky fish. Buy the best you can afford.

Ingredients

  • 5 ounces kosher salt (1 cup Diamond Crystal or ½ cup Morton)
  • ⅓ cup (packed) light brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 pound skin-on, boneless salmon fillet, preferably wild king
  • ½ teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • ½ teaspoon finely grated lime zest
  • ½ teaspoon finely grated orange zest

Recipe Preparation

  • Combine salt, granulated sugar, brown sugar, peppercorns, coriander seeds, fennel seeds, and red pepper flakes in a medium bowl. Spread half of curing mix in the center of a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet roughly the same size as the fish. Place fish, skin side down, on curing mixture. Spread lemon zest, lime zest, and orange zest evenly over fish; cover with remaining curing mixture. Bring edges of foil up and over salmon and crimp to enclose. Place another baking sheet on top of salmon and weigh down with several large cans or a heavy pot. Chill, unwrapping and flipping fish halfway through, 24 hours.

  • Rinse fish and pat dry; place, skin side down, on a cutting board. Using your longest, sharpest knife and wiping down blade with a moist towel between slices, cut on a diagonal ⅛"–¼" thick, leaving skin behind.

  • Do Ahead: Salmon can be cured 3 days ahead. Cover tightly and chill.

Recipe by The Saltry, Halibut Cove, AK,

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 390 Fat (g) 9 Saturated Fat (g) 1.5 Cholesterol (mg) 80 Carbohydrates (g) 46 Dietary Fiber (g) 1 Total Sugars (g) 45 Protein (g) 29 Sodium (mg) 2370Reviews Section

Citrus Cured Salmon

This recipe will provide you with an inexpensive and endless supply of cured salmon.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Salmon, Boneless And Skinless
  • 4 cups Kosher Salt
  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 3 whole Lemons
  • 3 whole Limes
  • 2 whole Oranges
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Coriander
  • 1 Tablespoon White Peppercorns

Preparation

With a grater, remove the zest of the citrus fruit. Mix the grated zest and coriander with the salt and sugar in a non-reactive dish, like Pyrex. The more snugly it all fits into the dish with the salmon, the better.

In a hot, dry pan, toast the white peppercorns until they exude their aroma, about 3 minutes. Put them on the counter or a cutting board, and using another heavy-bottomed pan, crush the toasted peppercorns. You could also use a mortar and pestle. Then add the cracked peppercorns to the salt mixture. Thoroughly mix all of these ingredients, then bury the salmon in this sandy mixture. Cover the dish in plastic, place a weight on top, and store in the refrigerator for 48 hours to cure.

After two days, remove the salmon from the curing mixture, rinse with water and pat dry. Slice it thinly and serve!


Michael Ruhlman's Citrus-Cured Salmon

1 cup/225 grams kosher salt
1/2 cup/100 grams sugar
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
1 tablespoon grated grapefruit zest
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon lime zest
One 2- to 3-pound/1- to 1.5-kilogram skin-on salmon fillet, pin bones removed and very thin pieces of flesh trimmed

In a small bowl, combine the salt and sugar and stir to distribute the sugar throughout the salt. In another small bowl, combine the citrus zests.

On a work surface, lay a sheet of aluminum foil large enough to extend beyond the length of the salmon. Spread a third of the salt mixture in the center of the foil to serve as a bed for the salmon. Place the salmon skin-side down on the salt. Distribute the citrus zest evenly across the salmon. Pour the remaining salt mixture over the salmon. It should be covered. Fold the foil up to contain the salt. Place another sheet of foil over the salmon and crimp the sheets together firmly. The idea is to have a tight package in which the salt mixture is in contact with all surfaces of the salmon.

Set the foil package on a baking sheet/tray. Set a pan or dish on top of the salmon and weight it down with a brick or a few cans. This will help press the water out of the salmon as it cures. Refrigerate the salmon for 24 hours.

Unwrap the salmon and remove it from the cure, discarding the foil and the cure. Rinse the salmon and pat dry with paper towels. To remove the skin, place the salmon skin-side down on a cutting board. Holding a sharp, thin, flexible knife at about a 30-degree angle, cut between the flesh and the skin. When you can get a grip on the skin, pull it back and forth against the knife to separate it from the flesh. Set the salmon on a rack or on paper towels on a tray and refrigerate for 8 to 24 hours, to allow the salt concentration to equalize and to dry the salmon further. Wrap the salmon in parchment/baking paper and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.


FAQs and Expert Tips:

Curing is a technique for preserving fresh meat or fish to prevent spoilage. This recipe uses a dry salt and sugar cure that draws out the liquid from the fish as well as adds flavor, in this case, citrus, black pepper, and fresh dill.

Yes, you can make cured salmon with frozen salmon as long as it’s of really good quality, ideally “sushi-grade“.

Cured salmon will stay fresh in the refrigerator for up to three day.


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For the Sous vide Salmon

Preheat a water bath to 110°F (43°C).

Remove the pin bones and skin from the salmon. Sprinkle the salmon with the citrus zest. Combine the salt and sugar together in a small bowl then sprinkle some over the salmon, there will be some left over. Place the salmon in the sous vide bag and lightly seal. Let the fish sit in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes but preferably several hours for the dry brine to take effect. Place the sous vide bag in the water bath and cook for 15 to 45 minutes, until heated through.

For more information on the cooking times you can read my detailed article which addresses why is there a range in sous vide cooking times.

Once cooked, remove the sous vide bag from the water bath and place in an ice bath until chilled.

For the Fennel Carpaccio

Remove the root of the fennel. Remove the fronds and reserve them, then thinly slice the fennel.

Add the orange juice, lemon juice, and olive oil to a bowl then whisk to combine. Add the fennel and toss to coat.

For the Pickled Onions

Add the onion, red wine vinegar, water, and sugar to a pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and let simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool.

To Assemble

Take the cooked and chilled salmon out of sous vide bag and pat dry. Thinly slice the salmon.

Place some of the fennel carpaccio on a plate along with its dressing. Top with several slices of salmon. Add some capers then sprinkle with the citrus zest. Top with some fennel fronds and pickled red onion. Sprinkle with sea salt then serve.


Citrus cured salmon with pickled baby cucumbers

6 lebanese cucumbers
½ medium red onion
1 tablespoon finely chopped lemongrass, white part only
½ cup sugar
2 teaspoons sea salt
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
¾ cup apple cider vinegar

METHODS

SERVES 12 | PREP AND COOK TIME 30 MINUTES + CURING TIME

Mix the salt, sugar and citrus zests together.

Line a shallow dish or tray with plastic wrap and put some of the salt mixture over the base. Place the salmon fillet, skin side down, on the bed of salt and then cover the fillet with the remaining salt mixture. Put another piece of plastic wrap over the fillet and then tightly wrap the plastic around the fish.

Put a slightly smaller tray or cutting board on the fish and weigh it down with a bowl or a couple of tins. Refrigerate for two days, turning the fish every 12 hours.

To make the pickled cucumbers, slice the cucumbers and onion with a sharp knife or mandolin into thin slices. In a medium bowl, combine the lemongrass, sugar, salt, coriander, pepper, and vinegar together. Add the cucumber and onion and chill at least 1 hour, stirring gently a couple of times. Serve cold. The cucumber will keep, chilled, up to 1 day.

Unwrap the fish and rub away any excess salt with paper towel. Put the fillet on to a clean board and thinly slice with a sharp knife. Cut the fillet as you would smoked salmon, starting at the tail end, holding the knife on the diagonal and cutting down towards the skin.


Three cured salmon recipes for the perfect make-ahead party food

Home-cured salmon ticks all boxes: wow factor, little fuss and easy to prep in advance. Here are three ideas… Credit: steve joyce

Follow the topics within this article

W hether it is piled lavishly on a toasted English muffin for Christmas Day breakfast or served as part of a festive party platter, a dish of freshly cured salmon is guaranteed to add a touch of luxury.

Though there are plenty of good supermarket options for smoked and cured salmon of various different flavours, nothing beats the taste of a fresh fillet that has been cured overnight in aromatics - and it's much easier than you'd think, too.

Here we give three vibrant options for creating your own a classic gravlax with honey-mustard sauce a bright, light citrus salmon, and a beetroot cure that brings the fish out in the most wonderful deep pink blush.

Cured citrus salmon

T his is an ideal dinner party starter, as it requires no last-minute cooking or fiddling around. Serve with a simple salad of lightly pickled cucumber and radishes and perhaps some rye or pumpernickel bread.

SERVES

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large orange
  • 2 limes
  • 1 unwaxed lemon
  • 3 tbsp sea salt flakes, such as Maldon
  • 2 tbsp golden caster sugar
  • 1 tsp juniper berries
  • 1 tsp black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • ½ tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 star anise
  • 4 tbsp dill, finely chopped
  • 1 whole filleted side of salmon, skin on, weighing about 1kg, scaled and pin-boned

METHOD

  1. Cover a large, shallow tin or tray with a triple thickness of cling film, leaving plenty of excess draping over the sides for wrapping the salmon later. Wash and dry the citrus fruits and finely grate the zests – if you have a Microplane grater, now is the time to put it to good use. Mix the grated zests with the sea salt flakes and sugar. Lightly crush the juniper berries, peppercorns and fennel and coriander seeds using a pestle and mortar and add to the salt mix. Break the star anise into small pieces and grind, then add to the salt mixture with half the chopped dill and mix well.
  2. Scatter one third of the salt mixture over the middle of the cling film-covered tin. Lay the salmon on top, skin-side down, and cover with the remaining salt mixture, pressing it into the fish with your hands. Tightly wrap the salmon in the cling film and cover with a second tin or tray topped with food items such as a bag of flour or sugar, or a couple of cans. Leave the salmon to cure in the fridge for 48 hours.
  3. Unwrap the salmon, scrape off as much of the salt as you can and pat dry. Scatter the salmon with the remaining chopped dill and cut into thin slices with a knife.

Recipe from Summer Berries & Autumn Fruits by Annie Rigg (Kyle Books, £19.99)

Beetroot-cured salmon with tarragon ricotta, pickled cucumber and dill

C uring is a great way of changing the texture and adding flavour to the fish, especially when other ingredients are introduced to the process. Beetroot adds a sweet, earthy taste as well as a splash of purple to the salmon. This pairs well with prosecco.

SERVES

INGREDIENTS

  • 300g fresh salmon fillet, skin on
  • 50g table salt
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 2 cooked beetroot, finely chopped
  • Zest and juice of 1 small lemon

For the pickled cucumber

  • ½ cucumber, peeled and cut into 1cm cubes
  • Small handful of dill, chopped
  • Good splash of white wine vinegar

For the tarragon ricotta

  • 100g ricotta
  • 4 sprigs of tarragon, leaves only, finely chopped
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Rye bread or soda bread, to serve

METHOD

  1. Place the salmon fillet in a non-reactive (glass, ceramic or stainless steel) container.
  2. Mix the salt, sugar, beetroot, lemon zest and juice together. Pour over the salmon fillet, cover with cling film and refrigerate for eight hours.
  3. Once the salmon has firmed up, wash off the curing salt and pat dry with paper towels. Cut the salmon vertically into 1cm slices (first cut down to the skin, then slice horizontally, to remove each slice cleanly from the skin) and lay on a serving plate.
  4. Mix the pickled cucumber ingredients together and pile next to the salmon. Do the same with the tarragon ricotta.
  5. Serve with slices of rye or soda bread.

Recipe from Prawn on the Lawn: Fish and seafood to share by Katie and Rick Toogood (Pavilion Books, £18.99)


Citrus Cured Salmon

It’s Monday – time to scale back. Drink more water, take a walk after dinner. Eat lighter, eat simpler. Undo what might have been done over the weekend of eating out with friends, drinks with co-workers or quick meals eaten on the run out of paper bags. I am currently in a very scaled-back mindset. This blog obviously has the most popularity when I post sugar and flour concoctions (don’t worry, there’s plenty in the queue) but for this week, I’m going to write about simple, clean, mindfully healthy recipes that are also incredibly fulfilling and delicious.

Over the weekend I dipped into Michael Ruhlman’s cookbook, “Ruhlman’s Twenty” and tackled the citrus cured salmon. This is not the type of recipe that calls my name. I love cured salmon in the form of lox, but this type of do-it-from-scratch recipe is a direct influence of my husband. He has made me see the joy in cooking for cooking’s sake. Not just eating the food, but enjoying the process. I can honestly say I thought he was crazy when I first heard him say, “I don’t even need to eat what I made, as long as I taste it and see that it came out well, I can move on.” I used to think this was ridiculous because I used to be a quantity over quality type eater. I used to think more was more. More mediocre food is better than less high-quality food. This is a mindset of an over-eater. As Matt taught me the joy of the process of cooking, I began to see what he meant. Just tasting that something you spent hours making came out well is beginning to be enough of a pay-off for me. And when you don’t eat as much, you have more to share. Which puts you in the middle of what food should be: communal.

I know what you’re thinking: this stuff is pretty easy to buy in the store. However, I never want to buy it because how old is that fish, anyway? And where did it come from? All these questions are answered simply if you just do it yourself. So, we bought a pound of salmon from the fresh fish counter, I grated lots and lots of zest and dumped kosher salt on it. 24 hours later – perfectly cured salmon with a HUGE citrus flavor. Amazing with cream cheese and capers and diced shallots on top of Matt’s homemade, toasted bread. This is eating simply and without regret!

Citrus Cured Salmon*

1.5 lb salmon filet
1 tsp orange zest
2 tsp lemon zest
1 tsp lime zest
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup sugar

In a small bowl, combine the salt and sugar and stir to distribute the sugar throughout the salt. In another bowl, combine the citrus zests. (Buy a Microplane.)

Lay a sheet of aluminum foil large enough to extend beyond the length of the salmon. Spread a third of the salt mixture in the center of the foil to serve as a bed for the salmon. Place the salmon skin-side down on the salt. Distribute the zest evenly across the salmon. Pour the remaining salt mixture over the salmon. It should be covered. Fold the foil up to contain the salt. Place another sheet of foil over the salmon and crimp the sheets together firmly. The idea is to have a tight package in which the salt mixture is in contact with all surfaces of the salmon.

Set the foil package on a baking sheet. Set another baking sheet or dish on top of the salmon and weight it down with a brick or a few cans from your pantry. This will help press the water out of the salmon as it cures. Refrigerate the salmon for 24 hours.

Unwrap the salmon and remove it from the cure, discarding the foil and the cure. Rinse the salmon and pat dry with paper towels. To remove the skin, place the salmon skin-side down on a cutting board. Holding a sharp, thin, flexible knife at about a 30-degree angle, cut between the flesh and the skin. When you can get a grip on the skin, pull it back and forth against the knife to separate it from the flesh. Set the salmon on a rack or on paper towels on a tray and refrigerate for 8 to 24 hours, to allow the salt concentration to equalize and to dry the salmon out further. Wrap the salmon in parchment and store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Serve sliced extremely thin on crackers, bagels, or with scrambled eggs for a hearty breakfast – the options are up to your tastes!

*adapted from Rhulman’s book in that we could only find 1.5lb filets of salmon and his recipe called for 2-3lbs.


Watch the video: Citrus Cured Trout Dish Tutorial Home Cooking. Eating Enhanced (January 2022).