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Sexy Summer Seafood Recipes from de Rodriguez

Sexy Summer Seafood Recipes from de Rodriguez

Chef Douglas Rodriguez shares some delicious recipes from his restaurant in South Beach, Miami.

In some respects, Chef Douglas Rodriguez of South Beach’s iconic De Rodriguez restaurant meets all the expectations for a celebrity chef. He’s charismatic, energetic, and a genius in the kitchen.

His eponymous restaurant is stylish and sultry with unmistakable Latin swagger — the kind of place where you can’t help but participate in a little "see and be seen" neck-craning. But from the moment that first cocktail shows up, swiftly followed by a sampler of specialty ceviches, you all but forget that there’s anyone else in the dining room.

A politician and his entourage, a few Latin American luminaries, or an entire table of college coeds might be just 10 feet away (and probably are), but they dwindle to insignificance when compared with the spicy, rich, zing-on-the-tongue, melt-in-the-mouth panoply of flavors that make up a De Rodriguez dinner.

Can you try most of his recipes at home? Certainly, but don’t expect the same effect. However, because Rodriguez’ Nuevo Latino cuisine is so absolutely perfect for summertime, we asked for two recipes that the average at-home gourmet could duplicate with a minimum of hassle and a fairly good chance of success.

Links to Recipes:

Tuna Watermelon Ceviche

Panela and Rum-Cured Salmon


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)


11 Best Kerala Recipes | Popular South Indian Recipes

Kerala Recipes- Prepare yourself for a culinary journey that canvases everything from exquisite seafood to ignored vegetables, from coconut milk to crispy curry leaves, from spluttering mustard seeds to soft and spongy appams. Prepare yourself for a scrumptious ride to 'God's own country'.

The food of Kerala is one that needs no introduction: It's simple, zesty, flavourful and offers an intelligent combination of potent spices. Unlike the cuisine of its neighbouring states, the food of Kerala prides itself on being predominantly non-vegetarian. You've got chicken, mutton, pork, beef and a thrilling range of seafood - mussels, crab, tiger prawns, king prawns, tiny prawns, oysters, sardines, mackerel, tuna and gorgeous red lobsters.

Mallu food isn't just about the recipes it reflects a meeting of cultures. Kerala hindus have a largely vegetarian menu and use coconuts that grow along the coast. Syrian Christians eat more fish and meat, and the Muslims make delicious breads and sizzling biryani. But some techniques and habits remain common through the state vegetables are cooked with mild spices and steamed in their own juices or cooked in yogurt coconut milk. Rice is the staple food and red rice is commonly eaten. Coconut oil is preferred for cooking and is what gives Malayali cuisine a distinct taste. (Why people eat with their hands in Kerala)

Kerala is also known as the 'land of spices' and has attracted traders and travelers for centuries. Its mountainous terrain has the perfect climate to support the cultivation of pepper, nutmeg, cardamom,cinnamon, cloves and turmeric. It's probably why they're prominently used in Mallu cooking. Coconut is an indispensable hero of the Kerala cuisine. It's used in everything - from hot curries to soothing desserts. Besides enhancing the taste of the dish, it blends and tones down the potency of the spices. Unripe mango is also used in some fish and vegetable preparations. So is lime juice and vinegar. The pulp extraction of tamarind (in the form of pulp) is also used very often to give the food a unique sour taste. (10 things you must eat in Kerala)