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Registry Basics: Pots and Pans Slideshow

Registry Basics: Pots and Pans Slideshow


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Cooking Essentials: 12-Inch Stainless Steel Fry Pan

It’s easy to get lost amid All-Clad’s many beautiful offerings, but the truth is you need one wonderful skillet and the stainless is, in our opinion, the way to go. Yes, you can upgrade to copper or copper core if you really want to, but chefs agree that the stainless does the job beautifully and looks beautiful doing it. It’s what we use every day. This will be your go-to pan for browning meat, sautéing vegetables, and just about everything else you do.

Cooking Essentials: Eight-Inch Nonstick Fry Pan

The greatest little pan on earth. It’s perfect for searing fish for two, cooking a chicken breast, or whipping up a pan sauce for a weeknight dinner. Or for making omelets, of course.

Cooking Essentials: Large Dutch Oven

Le Creuset is the Cadillac in this department, but Mario Batali and Martha Stewart produce equally colorful Dutch ovens that brown and braise like a dream. A larger size (5 ½ quarts and up) makes entertaining easy. You’ll take this from stovetop to oven to table so pick a color you love and let your Dutch oven reign cheerfully over your kitchen for years to come.

Cooking Essentials: Four-Quart Saucepan

A kitchen workhorse that is essential for making rice, sauces, soups, and blanching or steaming vegetables. Along with the frying pan, you’ll use this nearly every time you cook.

Cooking Essentials: Stainless Steel Roaster with Rack

All new brides who cook must have a roaster, partly because now everyone will be coming over to your house for the holidays. In addition to roasting a turkey, it also bakes a huge, crusty lasagna and nearly any other kind of casserole.

Baking Essentials: Nine-Inch Square Baking Dish

If you are an avid cook or baker, then these next five items are great to have in your cupboard. While they are good multitaskers, you probably won’t use them every day.

For brownies, lemon bars, or small pasta bakes, this is your pan.

Baking Essentials: Nine-Inch Round Cake Pan

For your husband’s first birthday as your husband, you may want to make him a homemade birthday cake — and you'll need one of these (they’re also perfect for soaking bread slices for French toast).

Baking Essentials: Glass Pie Plate

When you host your first Thanksgiving and roast a perfect turkey in your new roasting pan, you will want a pie plate to whip up your mother-in-law’s signature pecan pie, too. Choose glass over ceramic, as it allows you to check that the bottom crust is cooked and not soggy.

Baking Essentials: Loaf Pan

Can you imagine a life without banana bread or meatloaf? If you can’t then you need this pan.

Baking Essentials: Nonstick Muffin Pan

Just what you need to bake muffins, making serving breakfast to weekend guests simple… And don’t forget the cupcakes!

Bonus Piece: Grill Pan

While these nest three items aren’t essential, if you’ve got room in your kitchen for them, get ‘em. They will allow you to easily expand your culinary repertoire.

A grill pan makes cooking meat in the winter a breeze. Choose the brand according to your guests’ budget. We’ve used the All-Clad, Calphalon, and Le Creuset pans and each heat evenly on the stove top and sear a crusty grill mark.

Bonus Piece: Pasta Pot

Tall and deep, this pot can boil gallons of water for pasta or lobsters and drain the water in a snap with its built-in strainer. Any brand will do, as it’s unlikely you will use this pot more than once a month (or a year)…

Bonus Piece: Cast Iron Round Skillet

Cast iron has a very even heat and is great for searing meats or baking a savory cornbread right in the pan. A cast iron skillet will last you your whole marriage (and likely your children’s marriages, too) and be seasoned over the years.

Cooking Essentials: Commercial Baking Sheet

You will need at least two of these kitchen staples for baking cookies, roasting vegetables and meats in your oven, or if you ever want to make a Bûche de Noël.


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021


Take a Tour of Our 'Lifelong' Home

by Sharon and Howard Johnson, AARP Livable Communities

As Sharon and Howard Johnson designed and built their "lifelong home," they realized they were so passionate about the idea of aging in place, they wanted to introduce it to others. They became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded a nonprofit to spread the word about the advantages of building homes for people of all ages and abilities.

Scroll down to see pictures of their home, and learn about the design decisions that make it both attractive and suitable for all.

Come On In and Take a Look

After lots of research about how and where to live, we bought a lot in Twin Creeks, a walkable, transit-oriented development in Central Point, a city in Oregon's Rogue Valley. Our custom-built abode is a "lifelong housing certified" home.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

One-Story Living

We worked with W.L. Moore, Inc., a local builder, to create our 2,265-square-foot, single-story house, which features a master bedroom suite, two full baths and a multi-use "great room." Three additional rooms can be used as a bedroom, a home office or den.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Entrance

The threshold of our home's no-step entry is less than a half-inch high. That, and the 36" wide doorway, makes the house easily accessible for a wheelchair or a stroller. Wide halls (at right) and an open floor plan allow for easy mobility inside.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #1

The main area of our home is divided into activity areas including the kitchen, two dining areas, a conversation corner centered on a fireplace (not shown) and a “library, game, music” niche.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Great Room: View #2

In addition to natural light from a solar tube above the cooking area, the kitchen features recessed, accent and task lighting. Windows throughout our house are wide and lower to the floor for increased visibility to the outdoors. This photo shows our dining areas.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Kitchen

Our open kitchen features products and design elements that are Americans with Disability Act compliant, including a gas range with controls at the front so we aren't reaching over hot pots. There's a 5-foot turning radius between the island and the range.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Easy-Access Cabinetry

Kitchen drawers are easier to reach, see into and organize than lower-level cabinets. These drawers are strong enough to hold heavy pots and pans, dishes, platters and more.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Island Life

A fold-down surface at one end of the kitchen island sits at a useful height for wheelchair users or small children. Hiding the trash cans within the island keeps them in a handy, yet out of the way, spot.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Useful Storage and Utilities

The kitchen pantry has a wide door and plenty of reachable shelves. The raised, front-loading washer and dryer are easy to access. A motion sensor provides hands-free lighting.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Master Bedroom

The bedroom fits a king size bed without limiting mobility. Electrical outlets throughout the home are 22" above the floor for easier access (the standard is 12" to 18"). Light switches are "rocker" style, which are easier to use.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Shower

The tiled master bath shower has a no-step entry and is private, even though it has no curtain or door. The shower contains a grab bar and dual showerhead with a hand-held spray. The space is roomy enough for a shower seat if one is needed.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Bathrooms

The master bath (left) has two vanities, one with a removable front panel for wheelchair access if needed. The master closet is reached through an easy-pull 36" pocket door beyond the vanity area. The guest bath (right) has grab bars near the toilet and tub.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Garage

Having two garage doors rather than a single large one provides more room for both vehicles and passengers. Storage cabinets and a wall mount for garden tools keeps clutter to a minimum. The doorway into the house is 36" wide and step-free.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

The Backyard

Our 650-square-foot covered patio is accessible through three no-step French doors. The patio surface is stained concrete. A small, low-maintenance yard is fully enclosed and includes two 24" x 48" raised beds for vegetable gardening.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Our Lifelong Home!

Here we are! We're retired now but in 2013 we became Certified Aging-in-Place Specialists (CAPS) and founded Age-Friendly Innovators, Inc., a nonprofit that works on aging-in-place issues. With smart design, a house can be a home for life.

PHOTO COURTESY SHARON AND HOWARD JOHNSON

Slideshow originally published January 2015, republished May 2021



Comments:

  1. Feandan

    There can be you and are right.

  2. Kagataur

    Earlier I thought differently, many thanks for the help in this question.

  3. Cayle

    Eh, a bit late

  4. Lundy

    I agree, this is a great message.



Write a message