New recipes

Where to Eat in Washington, D.C. During the Inauguration Slideshow

Where to Eat in Washington, D.C. During the Inauguration Slideshow

6. Palena Café

Palena is known as much for the cheeseburger on the cafémenu as for the more elegant, seasonally driven food that is served in the dining room. After a stint as the White House chef, it was an interesting move for chef-restaurateur Frank Ruta to set his restaurant in Cleveland Park, far away from the glitzy, lobbyist-packed K Street dining scene. Though the restaurant’s dining room offers sophisticated menu items like Amish poussin, the café really shines as a low-key neighborhood spot, turning out a simple roast chicken from the wood-fired oven and homey pasta dishes like spaghetti with fingerling potatoes, pesto, and garden beans.

5. Ben’s Chili Bowl

The celebrity (and presidential) photos on the wall are clear indications of Ben's Chili Bowl's city landmark status, but the continuous lines out the door (and its election to The Daily Meal’s 101 Best Restaurants in America 2012 list) are evidence that the restaurant's chili cheese dogs are some of the best in the country. But those in the know don’t just order "dogs," they get the half-smokes, a half-pork, half-beef smoked sausage, which is a native D.C. specialty supposedly invented by Ben Ali, the original proprietor, whose sons took over the restaurant after his death. As the U Street Corridor/Shaw neighborhood around it has gentrified and become trendy, it's a more than 50-year-old bastion of down-home D.C. where college kids, old-timers, and celebrities are all welcome as long as they're willing to stand in line like everybody else, though the president eats for free.

4. Blue Duck Tavern

In October 2009, President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle celebrated their 17th wedding anniversary at the Blue Duck Tavern at the Park Hyatt, which features an open kitchen, a wood-burning oven, and Washington, D.C.'s first commercial Molteni range — in blue lacquer, no less. Chef Sebastien Archambault, who has worked with Alain Ducasse and Guy Savoy, among others, and chef de cuisine John Melfi put it to good use by slow roasting about three-quarters of the dishes on their menu. Roasted bone marrow with red wine apple butter; Muscovy duck breast with pumpkin relish; and Wagyu culotte of beef with red wine braised shallots are among the offerings, and there is first-rate apple pie among the desserts.

3. CityZen

Eric Ziebold, CityZen at Mandarin Oriental’s James Beard Award-winning executive chef, gets the diner's attention right away with his Parker House rolls, a puff of melt-in-your-mouth buttery dough, baked fresh during every dinner service. Highlights from Ziebold's tasting menus include pan-seared Washington state sturgeon with stuffed endive, sunchoke pudding, and crispy sunchoke flakes, and CityZen pork and foie gras boudin blanc with braised quince, baby leeks, Darden ham, and hyssop-red wine gastrique. For dessert, sample a sweet treat from executive pastry chef Matthew Petterson, who was voted "Fan Favorite" on the second season of Top Chef: Just Desserts. His sweet treats include Path Valley heirloom sweet potato pie with Swiss meringue, cinnamon anglaise, and butter pecan ice cream, and Valrhona chocolate brioche with roasted white chocolate and whole milk ice cream.

2. minibar

Yelp / Jocelyn O

After a summer hiatus that saw the closure of America Eats Tavern, his experiment in historical American food, José Andrés has reopened minibar with a culinary vengeance. To wit: reservations are now taken via email, and the price of admission to Andrés’ multicourse, progressive tasting menu of diminutive single-, two-, and three-bite dishes has jumped from $150 to a much more prohibitive $225 without wine pairings. "Minibar is my nerve center. It’s where everything begins," said Andrés. "It is a place of collaboration, of creativity, of love. Here we honor the past and traditions and translate that into ideas for our future."

In keeping with his image as this country’s unofficial culinary ambassador of Spanish cuisine, chef Andrés hired Spanish architect and designer Juli Capella as well as local Washington, D.C. firm CORE to help construct a destination both inventive and inviting enough to match Andrés’ ThinkFoodGroup’s aspirations. Those aspirations are exceeded in the dining room, where guests can delve into more than 20 courses, including surprising tastes such as olive oil soup with mandarin, beech mushroom risotto with truffle, and smoked oyster escabeche.

1. The Inn at Little Washington

Patrick O'Connell, self-taught as a chef, opened this restaurant in 1978 in what was originally a garage in a little town in Washington, Va., about an hour's drive from D.C. He formed alliances with local farmers and artisanal producers long before it was fashionable, and developed into a sophisticated modern American chef of the highest order. His partnership with The Inn co-founder Reinhardt Lynch ended in 2007, but praise for this Five Diamond Award-winning property has continued.


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich Hatfield (1929–)

Antoinette Hatfield’s talents and sense of style and her support of the arts in Oregon have earned her a place in American political history. With her organizational and culinary skills, she transformed food and fashion into political currency and social capital, both in Oregon and in Washington, D.C., helping to establish and extend the reputation and political effectiveness of her husband, Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield.

Antoinette Marie Kuzmanich was born in Portland on January 17, 1929, the only child of Vincent and Josephine Theresa (Leovich) Kuzmanich. She graduated from the University of Oregon in 1950 and earned a Master of Arts degree from Stanford University. In 1957, she was named Counselor for Women at Portland State College (now Portland State University) in April 1958, she became the college’s first female dean.

On July 8, 1958, at the Hinson Memorial Baptist Church in Portland, Kuzmanich married Oregon Secretary of State Mark Odom Hatfield, a few months before he was elected governor. She had been raised in the Catholic tradition, and she converted to Hatfield’s Baptist faith at her marriage. They had four children. The couple’s first home was at the Royal Court Apartments in Salem, and in 1960 they moved to 883 High Street SE. They remodeled the 1901 house to expand the first-floor public space, which Ladies’ Home Journal vividly reported in 1960. Antoinette Hatfield also gained press attention for her fashionable clothes and gracious demeanor.

During Mark Hatfield’s first years as governor, Antoinette Hatfield hosted weekly teas that drew up to eight hundred women at a time to their home during legislative sessions. Describing the teas in a simple and uncomplicated way, she said that “the teas just happened women came in the front door and left at the back." While the teas appeared to be effortless, they were carefully planned and staffed by friends, family, and supporters.

The author of five cookbooks, Antoinette Hatfield gained visibility and media attention from fashion, food, and society writers, and her name was often paired with luminaries such as Julia Child and James Beard. Marian Burros (Washington Post), Ann Reisman (Harper’s Bazaar), and Jeryme English (Statesman Journal) were her publicity machine, pushing out news in newspapers across the country of Hatfield’s recipes, her fashion sense, and her husband’s position. The first of her five cookbooks, ReMarkable Recipes from the Recipe File of Mrs. Mark O. Hatfield (1966), featured Eastern European dishes and recipes for finger food, desserts, and punch.

In 1967, the Hatfield family moved to Washington, D.C., when Mark was elected as Oregon’s U.S. Senator. Antoinette’s second cookbook reflected the couple’s prominence in the capital, with recipes contributed by celebrities, politicians, and journalists. The recipes and cookbook brought the Hatfields national press coverage, visibility that provided a softer side of Senator Hatfield’s politicking and drew attention to Oregon as a desirable and hospitable place.

Long-time political allies John Dellenback, a Republican congressman from Oregon, and his wife Mary Jane organized small private suppers at the Hatfields’ home to bring those with conflicting views to agreement and compromise. James Beard Award winner Jeanne Lesem attributed the phrase “dinner table diplomacy” to Antoinette in 1971: “She regards home entertaining as a very important force in the capital ‘because you can discuss some things more easily over a bowl of soup than from two sides of a desk.’”

During the 1970s and 1980s, real estate values soared in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield and other congressional wives had a social network that brought buyers and sellers together. As a licensed real estate broker, her earnings paid for her children’s schooling. In a 1979 article in the Miami News, she was quoted as saying, “‘Nobody gives any wife credit for being able to do anything in this town without her husband.…I would hope that my ability is what does it.’”

The Hatfields returned to Portland in 1996 when Mark retired from the U.S. Senate. Antoinette opened the Antoinette Hatfield Gallery in downtown Portland, showcasing artists such as Jan Koot, Dean Larson, John Van Dreal, Shirley Gittelsohn, and others. The gallery closed its doors in 1999.

Hatfield always credited her husband’s accomplishments rather than her own. In a eulogy to his father, who died on August 7, 2011, Mark O. Hatfield Jr. said that his mother “has made sacrifices most of us will never know, under more difficult circumstances than anyone should have to. Always the matriarch, she is the woman behind the man, in front of the world.”

Antoinette Hatfield continues to live in Portland. She is an advocate for the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon’s cultural community, serving on the boards of the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Ballet, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. In 2007, the New Theater Building in Portland'5 Centers for the Arts was renamed Antoinette Hatfield Hall. She received the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation's Ageless Award in 2019.

Antoinette K. Hatfied received the 2019 Ageless Award from the Jesse F. Richardson Foundation, Portland, Oregon..


Watch the video: Washington DC Inauguration Slideshow (January 2022).