New recipes

The Alpine

The Alpine


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

  1. Home
  2. Drink
  3. Cocktails and Spirits

4

1 rating

June 19, 2013

By

Madeline Monaco

Alpine

Boston brasserie Eastern Standard is overseen by award-winning mixologist Jackson Cannon and is a leader in the craft cocktail movement. The restaurant's Alpine cocktail is a perfect mix of gin, smoky Amaro, and a dash of grapefruit, all combined to make this cocktail unique and delicious.

1

Servings

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Ounce Junipero Gin
  • 3/4 Ounces Amaro Nonino
  • 1/2 Ounce Dry Vermouth
  • Dash of Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters

Directions

Stir, and strain into a martini glass. Add orange twist garnish.

Tags


The Alpine - Recipes

4 T cold butter, divided 2 c all-purpose flour 1/4 c snipped chives 4 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp baking soda 2 T vegetable shortening 1 c. buttermilk Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 450. Place 2 tsp of the butter in small [. ]

Main Dishes

Penne Rustica (R.S. Christmas Dinner)

1 lb Penne Pasta 2 Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts 1/2 c (2 oz) chopped Prosciutto (or you can use bacon) Gratinata Sauce: 3 T Butter 2 T minced garlic 1 1/2 T red wine vinegar 2 c heavy whipping cream 1/2 c milk 1/2 c chicken [. ]

Breads

Deluxe Blueberry Muffins

1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground allspice 1 c Libby's solid pack pumpkin 1/4 c undiluted evaporated milk 1/3 c shortening 1 c packed light brown sugar 1 [. ]

Desserts

Baklava – Elizah

1 (16 oz) package phyllo dough 1 pound chopped nuts 1 cup butter 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 c water 1 c white sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/2 c honey Directions: Preheat oven to 350. Butter the bottom and sides of a 9 X 13 pan. Chop nuts and [. ]

Sauces and Dips

Steak Marinade

1 T olive oil 1 garlic clove 1 T Worcestershire sauce 1 T balsamic vinegar or 1 T white vinegar 1 tsp yellow mustard 1 T soy sauce Mix all ingredients together and place steaks into the freezer bag with marinade, preferably [. ]

Main Dishes

Swiss Steak – Larae Whale

2 lbs round steak (cut into portions) flour 1 can stewed tomatoes 1 pkg. Lipton Onion Soup Mix Directions: In crock pot, poure in stewed tomatoes. Chop tomatoes slightly with large spoon. Add soup mix. Mix well. Rinse meat pieces in cold [. ]

Breakfast

Deluxe Scrambled Eggs

2 oz cream cheese, softened 1 T milk 3 eggs 3 oz cooked ham, diced 1 green onion, thinly sliced 1 tsp butter 1. In bowl microwave cream cheese and milk on high 25-30 seconds. Add eggs, whisk until blended 2 In small saute pan, heat ham, green [. ]

Uncategorized

Beef Stew- Aunt Michelle

1 1/2 pounds Stew meat 4 medium potatoes chopped 3 carrots chopped 3 stalks of celery chopped 1 med. onion chopped 1 pkg mixed vegetables Cook in crock pot about 5 hours Salt and pepper to taste After cooking for 5 hours mix in [. ]

Desserts

Apple Crumb Pie

Use a crust recipe of your choice Pie Filling: 1lb. peeled and sliced apples 1/2 c sugar 3 T flour 1/4 tsp nutmeg 1/4 tsp cinnamon dash of salt Crumb Topping: 1 c flour 1 c sugar 1 c butter Mix til crumbly - this should cover 2 [. ]

Uncategorized

Choco Chocolate Brownies

2 prepared brownie mixes of your choice 1 large symphony candy bar Directions: Mix one prepared brownie mix in a bowl and pour in the bottom of a 12" dutch oven. Break candy bar into squares and place on top of brownie mix. MIx second Brownie Mix [. ]

A Happy Home Recipe

Take love and loyalty, mix it thoroughly with faith. Blend it with tenderness, kindness and understanding. Add friendship and hope, sprinkle abundantly with laughter. Bake it with sunshine. Serve daily with generous helpings.


Alpine Village Inn’s Chicken Supreme Soup gets new life

The popularity of the seasoned cottage cheese recipe from the Alpine Village Inn, which closed 20 years ago, prompted publication of a favorite soup recipe.

After the huge response to the request for the seasoned cottage cheese recipe served at Alpine Village Inn, which closed more than 20 years ago, I said I’d run the equally popular Chicken Supreme Soup recipe. I didn’t have to look it up — Marilyn Basinger sent a copy of one the Review-Journal printed in April 1997:

Boil 2 quarts water, 2 teaspoons celery salt, 2 teaspoons Accent, 1 pound cooked ground chicken, 2 teaspoons salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, 1 teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet, 2 tablespoons chicken bouillon and 2 to 3 ground carrots for 30 minutes. In a separate pan, heat 1/2 cup oil until smoking add 1 cup flour and stir with a whisk until the consistency of mashed potatoes. Add to soup and use whisk to blend. Add yellow food coloring, if desired.

More on the cottage cheese recipe: Greg Hammet emailed to point out that the ingredients list on his vintage container of the seasoning differs from the recipe we ran my advice is to take all “authentic” recipes with a grain of salt because they can lose something in the translation.

And Matt Becker of Becker Gaming emailed to say Charlie’s Down Under, 1950 N. Buffalo Drive, serves the chicken soup on the last Thursday of the month, adding, “We have customers bringing in cast-iron bowls that it was originally served in.”

More reader requests

Shannon Irving is looking for Cacique Cilantro Lime sour cream, which she bought somewhere in Las Vegas, but can’t remember where.

Erica Thomas is looking for Open Pit Barbecue Sauce, which she used to get at Winco.

Tootsie Popowcer is looking for a restaurant that will prepare a hamburger medium-rare, adding that she’s frequently promised, but ends up sending them back.

I always knew readers were fond of the old Alpine Village Inn, which closed more than 20 years ago. But I learned just how much they missed the place after Loretta Eichelberger requested the recipe for its seasoned cottage cheese dip and I, who had misplaced it, turned to all of you.

We received responses from Bob Fisher, Dottie Shull-Krob, Peggy Carson, Belinda King, Jane Forbes, Holly Macdonald, Karen Kissam, Phyllis Hendrickson, Nancy Caudill, Patti Gray, Bari Hankins, Kolene Copas, Ann Brown, Marilyn Roth, Tara Klimek, Donna Hall, Nancy Ozun, Jane Lewis, Elsie Goldsworthy, Bill Davis, Merri Davenport and Mary Ann Bianco.

Here’s the recipe: Mix 2 pounds small-curd cottage cheese with 1/2 teaspoon caraway, 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar, 1 teaspoon Accent, 1/2 teaspoon white pepper, 1 tablespoon dried chives and 1/2 teaspoon celery salt. Chill at least several hours or overnight. Serve as a condiment or dip.

Paul Harbaugh sent an alternative recipe: Mix Smith’s Ranch Dressing mix with cottage cheese to taste and spread on Triscuits. “Add some cherry tomatoes for a treat.”

And Ozun asked me to publish the Alpine Village chicken-soup recipe. Look for that in an upcoming column.

More reader requests

Joel Lengyel is looking for a local source for Trappey’s Mexi-Pep Hot Sauce salsa picante.

Pat Nation is looking for grape leaves in jars.

George Swede, assisting a neighbor, is looking for B&G hot cherry peppers.

And Charles Butler is looking for split-top hot-dog buns, other than the King’s Hawaiian brand, which are too sweet.

Rhubarb may be all over the place — sometimes literally — in some parts of the country, but it’s a rare and wonderful thing in Southern Nevada, especially since the frozen version has all but disappeared from supermarkets. But readers found it for Barbara Wagner.

Helga Smith (who emailed, “There are not many things more refreshing on a hot summer day than homemade rhubarb compote, served chilled/iced.”) has found it at Vons at 2667 E. Windmill Parkway in Henderson, and she and Eileen Hug found it at Smith’s at 2385 E. Windmill Lane — both sporadically, Smith said. Penny Reese reported finding it at Albertsons at 5975 W. Tropicana Ave. Nancy A. Nolette said it’s available at Winco at 80 N. Stephanie St. in Henderson there’s another Winco at 6101 N. Decatur Blvd. I’ve found it at Whole Foods Market, Sprouts Farmers Market and some Smith’s stores. And Ann Brown has found the frozen version at Sprouts, though she said it’s “hit and miss.”

More on ribs: For readers looking for Tony Roma’s ribs, Joe Kennedy recommended the “excellent” ribs at Trader Joe’s.

More reader requests

Anita Kramer is looking for Concord Foods’ Apple Crisp mix, which she found at Smith’s.

David D. Werner is looking for Eckrich Cotto Salami.

Mike Miller is looking for a clam dip similar to Reser’s, which he used to get in Oregon.

And here’s a blast from the past: For years I kept the recipes from the old Alpine Village Inn on file, but as the number of queries dropped, I lost track of them. Loretta Eichelberger, who said she has the chicken soup recipe, wonders if any readers have the recipe for the gone-but-not-forgotten restaurant’s cottage cheese dip.

Tony Roma’s restaurants aren’t as numerous as they used to be, but the company’s ribs live on — which should come as good news to Ruth Mintz, who’s looking for the frozen, precooked ones she used to get at Costco. Helen Moreland and Dolores Norelli found them at Walmart, and Karen Kelso reported spotting them at Target at 9725 S. Eastern Ave.

For Nancy Shepherd, who’s looking for Durkee’s Famous Sauce, CeCi Schreiber, Ed Miller and Ann Brown reported finding it at Albertsons Jim Lucy said he found it at Winco, which has stores at 80 N. Stephanie St. in Henderson and 6101 N. Decatur Blvd.

More on natural-casing hot dogs: Howard Pratschler of Bullhead City, Arizona, recommended Hoffy franks, which are available at Smart & Final Extra stores.

More on eggs Benedict: Marilyn Roth recommended Weiss Restaurant Deli Bakery at 2744 N. Green Valley Parkway in Henderson, which she said serves variations made with lox or portobella mushrooms instead of ham.

More reader requests

Jim Migliore is looking for a restaurant that serves chicken-fried steak breaded in-house, as opposed to a frozen product.

Ed Frediani is looking for fresh baby artichokes, which he said are great fried in olive oil.

Michael Offord is looking for a local source for Wensleydale Cheese from England.

Penny Reese is looking for Red Rose tea bags, which she used to get at Walmart.


How to make it

While the bacon lardons are optional, I definitely recommend making them! Add ¼-inch wide bacon pieces to a cold frying pan and turn on the heat to medium heat.

Cook, stirring regularly, until the fat renders and the bacon is browned and crispy, about 8 to 10 minutes. Time can vary based on the thickness of the bacon and also personal preference for bacon doneness. Remove the lardons with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel-lined plate.

Next, make the caramelized onions. In a frying pan over medium-low heat melt the butter. Alternatively cook the onions in 2 tablespoons bacon fat if you are cooking bacon lardons for the garnish.

You can just use the same frying pan and remove all but 2 tablespoons of the fat from the pan. Add the onions, season with salt, and cook, stirring regularly until soft and golden, about 30 minutes (PHOTOS 1-2). Set aside.

Meanwhile, make the applesauce. You can do this while your onions are cooking to save time. Place the apples in a saucepan with water and cover (PHOTO 3).

Simmer gently on medium-low heat, stirring once or twice, until the apple is completely tender, about 20 minutes. Mash with a fork until smooth (PHOTO 4). Set aside.

All of the above can be done in advance and refrigerated for up to 4 days before proceeding with the rest of the recipe. If the bacon softens in that time, add it to a frying pan for a minute or two just to re-crisp it before using.

Next, add the cubed potatoes to a large pot and cover generously with salted water. Bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, immediately add the macaroni and continue to cook until the macaroni is barely al dente and the potatoes are tender. The exact time will depend on the macaroni shape. It&rsquos about 10 minutes for ziti. Drain the macaroni and potatoes.

Return to the drained macaroni and potatoes to the same pot, add the cream and return to medium heat. Stir until the cream starts to heat up (a minute or so) (PHOTO 5). Then add the grated cheese, a little salt, and a bit of freshly grated nutmeg.

Keep stirring until the cheese has melted into a thick and luscious sauce (PHOTO 6). It will happen quickly. Be careful not to overmix, as you don't want the potatoes breaking up.

Serve the cheesy Alpine macaroni on individual plates topped with caramelized onions, crispy bacon lardons if desired, and with applesauce on the side.

There is no right or wrong way to eat Alpine macaroni. Some people choose to eat their applesauce together with their macaroni while others save the applesauce and eat it afterwards for dessert. The intention of the applesauce is to help cut the richness of the cheese. Whether you mix it in, go back and forth with bites of älplermagronen and applesauce, or save the sauce for later, it's all good!


Alpine Mac and Cheese

This white cheddar mac and cheese recipe is ideal when you&rsquore craving this comfort dish, but want a change from the traditional yellow cheese variety. Made with Cabot Alpine Cheddar cheese and topped with a lovely layer of breadcrumbs before baking in the oven, this recipe is deliciously satisfying and easy to make too! Share the recipe with family and friends on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter.

To make this white mac and cheese, begin by preheating your oven to 375°F degrees. Cook pasta until al dente, drain, place in a large bowl and set aside.

Melt the Cabot Salted Butter in a heavy-bottomed pot or saucepan over medium heat. Add the minced garlic and cook until the garlic starts to soften and brown a bit. Using a whisk, stir in the flour, a little at a time, until it is well blended. Continue stirring, letting it cook for a minute or two. Slowly add the warm milk and keep whisking for another couple of minutes.

Adjust the heat to low and add the Cabot Alpine Cheddar cheese. Stir with a whisk or spoon until the cheese melts and is blended into the mixture. Add the dried oregano and dried thyme and cook, stirring for about 3 or 4 minutes. When the sauce is done, add about half of it to the pasta and mix well. Then add the remaining sauce and blend.

Transfer the mixture to a lightly greased 13 x 9-inch baking dish and top with the breadcrumbs until the top of the pasta is lightly covered. Place in the pre-heated oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until hot and bubbly.

For another hearty and satisfying mac & cheese recipe, try this Cuban Mac & Cheese. Cabot is a co-operative of over 800 farm families and has been producing award-winning dairy products for many years. We&rsquod love to hear your feedback on this Alpine Mac & Cheese, so please rate the recipe after you&rsquove tried it!

Ingredients

1 lb. penne, large elbows or shells
4 cups milk, warm
16 ounces Cabot Alpine Cheddar, grated (about 4 cups)
8 tablespoons (1 stick) Cabot Salted Butter
8 tablespoons King Arthur All-Purpose Flour
1 cup of Panko bread crumbs
2 or 3 cloves of fresh garlic, minced
1 teaspoon oregano (dried)
1 teaspoon thyme (dried)


Today I&rsquom sharing my recipe for Slow Cooker Alpine Pork Chops. This recipe is a spin off from my recipe Slow Cooker Alpine Chicken but with pork instead. It&rsquos a recipe I got from a friend named Kelliss. I haven&rsquot found her exact recipe online which is rare nowadays. Though I found this interesting version of alpine chicken that has mayonnaise in it, I love that they made their own stuffing and add fresh veggies, that recipe looks worth trying too.

My favorite thing about this recipe is the crunchy almonds. Very rare a slow cooker recipe has great texture like this one. Stay tuned I may be adding almonds and other nuts to more recipes!

How to make this:

To start this recipe I start with my 6-quart oval slow cooker. I add boneless pork chops to the slow cooker, though bone-in works great too.

Next I add 8 slices of swiss cheese. I&rsquom not a huge swiss cheese fan but in this recipe it melts into the next step, you&rsquoll see and makes for a wonderful sauce.

The next layer is cream of chicken soup, milk and pepper. Very simple to mix together. This is the liquid for this recipe.

Next for the crunchy almonds. Note in this step that only half of the almonds go down. My friend Kellis does it this way and it&rsquos a great crunchy layer.

The next photos is three more layers: stove top stuffing, butter and the rest of the almonds. The butter helps moisten the stuffing. I love using stove-top stuffing in recipes in the slow cooker, makes great casseroles. Cook this for 6 hours on low.

Here is what the casserole looks like after cooking for 6 hours. The edges get a little toasty and the cheesy creamy sauce forms.

This recipe for Slow Cooker Alpine Pork is very comforing and a complete meal, just needs some greens on the side.

I wasn&rsquot sure how the pork would turn out in this dish, but the flavors were great. These pork chops turn out very tender and go great with the sauce, stuffing and almonds. This is a great dish to make for company or as a meal to bring to a family who needs help with dinner. I hope you enjoy this recipe. Have a great week.


Alpine Cooking: A Culinary Adventure at 3,000 Feet

How to Milk a Twinkie, with Josh Scherer of YouTube Phenomenon @GoodMythicalMorning

Meredith Erickson takes us on an Alpine journey to discover the food and pleasures of the little-known huts and lodges above 3,000 feet. Plus, we chat with Josh Scherer of Good Mythical Morning about the internet’s fascination with taste-test videos we learn the secrets to the perfect Neapolitan meatball and Adam Gopnik tells us why sugar sales are declining.

This episode is brought to you by Ferguson.

“My question is about shrimp. Frozen shrimp and the additives that are in about 99% of the shrimp that I find at the supermarket&mdashthey all seem to have this particular additive that I can smell. I’m just curious why it seems like no one else really seems to notice this?”

“My question has to do with making beef stock. I follow the same procedure year after year but sometimes the stock is more gelatinous than other years. Do you know why this is?”

“I have made several banana bread recipes and they all turn out soupy. Do you have any tips or a good banana bread recipe?”


Classic recipe from old Alpine Village Inn remembered

The Las Vegas restaurant closed more than 20 years ago, but the recipe for seasoned cottage cheese dip lives on.

I always knew readers were fond of the old Alpine Village Inn, which closed more than 20 years ago. But I learned just how much they missed the place after Loretta Eichelberger requested the recipe for its seasoned cottage cheese dip and I, who had misplaced it, turned to all of you.

We received responses from Bob Fisher, Dottie Shull-Krob, Peggy Carson, Belinda King, Jane Forbes, Holly Macdonald, Karen Kissam, Phyllis Hendrickson, Nancy Caudill, Patti Gray, Bari Hankins, Kolene Copas, Ann Brown, Marilyn Roth, Tara Klimek, Donna Hall, Nancy Ozun, Jane Lewis, Elsie Goldsworthy, Bill Davis, Merri Davenport and Mary Ann Bianco.

Here’s the recipe: Mix 2 pounds small-curd cottage cheese with 1/2 teaspoon caraway, 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar, 1 teaspoon Accent, 1/2 teaspoon white pepper, 1 tablespoon dried chives and 1/2 teaspoon celery salt. Chill at least several hours or overnight. Serve as a condiment or dip.

Paul Harbaugh sent an alternative recipe: Mix Smith’s Ranch Dressing mix with cottage cheese to taste and spread on Triscuits. “Add some cherry tomatoes for a treat.”

And Ozun asked me to publish the Alpine Village chicken-soup recipe. Look for that in an upcoming column.

Joel Lengyel is looking for a local source for Trappey’s Mexi-Pep Hot Sauce salsa picante.

Pat Nation is looking for grape leaves in jars.

George Swede, assisting a neighbor, is looking for B&G hot cherry peppers.

And Charles Butler is looking for split-top hot-dog buns, other than the King’s Hawaiian brand, which are too sweet.


Recipes

Baklouti Chili Agrumato - Cheddar Cheese Cornbread New!

Balsamic Ganache Truffles

Peach White Balsamic Bellini New!


Facebook

Boil all soup ingredients together for about 30 minutes. To prepare the roux, heat oil until smoking add flour and stir with a wire whisk. It should be the consistency of mashed potatoes. Add to soup and use the wire whisk to blend. If you want to be really authentic, serve it in a small cast iron cauldron with hot bread & butter!

OK, that's the "official" recipe, at least according to the Review-Journal. Now here is the way I do it and why.

I have spent a great deal of time replicating recipes from restaurants that I have dined at. I'm pretty good at it if I do say so myself. When I replicate an unknown recipe, I go by a few clues. Number one is taste and texture. Number two is the era that the recipe was created and/or made. If you have a trained palate, you can taste most of what is contained within a dish. I taste for spices, seasoning, standouts, flavors. I also taste for texture. Is it smooth or chunky, gritty or mealy? I look at the food in question. What can I see in it? If I see celery, onions or carrots, what size are they cut to? Is the size uniform? Are they soft and mushy or still crisp? As for the era that the dish is from, this tells me what type of fats were used. It also tells me how it was prepared. In example, food processors were not in wide use in the ླྀs. Lard and tallow were in wide use as fats, not vegetable oil. All these things and more.

In replicating this recipe, I took all of these factors into consideration, which is why I do not believe that the recipe given above is correct. A restaurant that buys cases of whole, raw, chickens everyday is going to end up with a considerable amount of leftover bones. Every restaurant I've ever been in uses these bones to make their own homemade chicken stock. Why not, it's basically free and a great way to use up product that would otherwise be thrown away. No restaurant would use bouillon cubes to make a watery, salty chicken broth when they have all those bones left over! Basically, the entire technique for making the soup is incorrect. Without going into great detail, a cream of chicken soup, as this was, is a chicken Veloute sauce finished with cream which then makes it a Chicken Supreme Sauce. The vegetables in the soup were also non visible and barely detectable, which also lets me know the original soup was pureed as well. A pureed, Veloute soup has a certain technique that is used and the RJ recipe does not reflect that at all. The following recipe and technique is as close as I have been able to come to recreating the original.

Typically, there are three main types of thick soups pureed, Veloutes and Cream Soups. This soup was not a true Veloute soup because it wasn't finished with a liaison of egg yolks and cream. It was pureed, but it was also thickened with a roux. It's not a true Cream soup since it didn't contain cream, at least not according to the recipe. So, technically speaking, this was a hybrid soup, mainly a pureed soup, but used the roux & stock base of a Veloute.

The R-J recipe calls for ground chicken meat and I do believe that back in the ཮s & ླྀs, this would have probably been the case. Back then, Salmonella was not a big issue and it would have been no problem for the restaurant to grind the chicken meat up BEFORE cooking it, i.e. RAW! In today's world, very few butcher shops will risk contaminating their meat grinder with raw chicken, as it would then need to be torn completely apart, cleaned and sterilized and re assembled. Shops don't want to risk cross contamination and neither should you! For that reason, I would now recommend either cooking the chicken pieces in the stock first and then grinding them up, or grinding your own. The difference in the finished product is noticeable however, but if you want to go totally authentic, then you will probably need to grind your own chicken up, just be careful and hygienic. Whether you decide to grind up the raw meat in advance, or cook the chicken first is also going to affect the final preparation of the soup. Personally, I think that it's better to grind up the raw meat first and then lightly saute it and add it to the soup at the very end. In this manner, the meat will remain a little chunky and be very flavorful. Otherwise, it's faster and easier to do it as this recipe describes, bit it's VERY important to completely puree the soup, along with the meat in a blender. A food processor doesn't do a good enough job of pureeing the soup and the soup turns out mealy with chicken meat fibers in it.

With all of that in mind, here is the recipe which I feel is the closest you are going to get to the original. In any case, it's WAY better than the R-J recipe!

First of all, start with 2 quarts of chicken stock rather than water, preferably home made. Put one cut up chicken into the cold stock along with ONE TEASPOON of the celery salt and the Accent and bring it up to a boil. It is important to add half of those ingredients in the beginning, as soup is not something that responds well to last minute additions of salt. When it just comes to a boil, reduce the heat and let the chicken simmer in the stock for about an hour. During this cooking time, scum will appear on the surface, skim it off as it comes to the surface. Use a fine mesh strainer and also skim off the fat which will rise to the top. Once the chicken is cooked, pull it out and let it cool. Pull the skin off and discard or feed it to your dog. Pull the meat off the bones, chop it up and set the meat aside, for now.

Alternative (Desired) Method:

Pull the RAW chicken meat from the bones and put the stripped bones into the COLD stock. At this point, you will put the bones only back into the stock and cook them another hour or two over a slight simmer to get the flavor out of the bones. Grind up the meat. finely! I use an old fashioned meat grinder fitted with the finest die I have to do this. You could use a food processor and pulse it to obtain a fine grind, but I feel it comes out like mush! Additionally, they didn't have food processors back then, at least not in wide use. Saute the ground raw chicken in a couple tablespoons of butter for about 3 minutes, stirring with a fork to break up the chicken so it doesn't clump together. Remove from heat and set the chicken aside for now.

Strain the stock and discard the bones. Add enough water to the stock to bring it back up to two quarts since no doubt, some of the original volume has evaporated. Now, add the ground onions and carrots back to the stock and cook for a half-hour. After a half-hour, add the chopped cooked chicken back to the pot along with the rest of the ingredients, except for the bouillon cubes and the Kitchen Bouquet. You won't need the bouillon now because you used chicken stock to begin with! This will also cut the amount of sodium by more than half! The Kitchen Bouquet is a thick, basically flavorless caramel syrup that is used in brown gravies to make them appear darker and richer. This was a white, cream soup, you wouldn't ever use that, at least I wouldn't! If you would like your soup to have a grayish beige color, then go ahead and add the Kitchen Bouquet! Allow to all simmer together for at least another 15 minutes. Now stir in the roux a spoonful at a time until the desired thickness is achieved. You want the roux to be hot and the soup to be hot when incorporating the roux! Once it is where you want, allow to simmer another half-hour or so and then taste for salt and seasoning and correct as needed. Allow the soup to cool for about 15 minutes and puree the soup in a blender. If you have the cooked, chopped chicken, add it to the soup BEFORE you puree it in the blender. Puree the soup until it is very smooth and no chunks remain. If you ground the RAW chicken meat and sauteed it, (preferred), then add the sauteed meat to the soup AFTER it is pureed.

Once the soup is finished, take a half cup of the hot soup and stir it into a cup of heavy cream at room temperature. This is known as tempering the cream. Once the hot soup has been incorporated into the cream, now stir the warmed cream back into the soup pot. Keep at a low simmer and serve at once. The cream makes the soup noticeably whiter and richer in texture and flavor.

Also, when making the roux, use clarified butter instead of oil! Bring the butter up to the point that it is hot, but not smoking! Now, whisk in the flour all at once and whisk to dissolve and incorporate all of the flour. Turn the heat down and just cook the roux over low for about 3 minutes! Do not let the roux cook longer or begin to darken or turn "blond". After 3 minutes over low heat, stirring constantly, remove from heat and add the HOT roux to the soup a spoonful at a time until the desired consistency is achieved. Then, let it cook for a few minutes and see if you need more roux. Roux is only a thickener, so you probably won't need it all. If you add all the roux this recipe calls for, you will end up with a soup so thick, it will only be good as pot pie filling!

ALPINE VILLAGE SEASONED COTTAGE CHEESE

2 pounds cottage cheese, small curd, drained

1 tsp. Beau Monde Seasoning

1 tablespoon dried minced onion

This is not the "standard "RJ" recipe, but one that I feel more accurately replicates the original. I have based this on the taste of the original mix, as well as the ingredient list on the back of the jar. The RJ version leaves out a few ingredients which I feel are key to the flavor.

Pour the cottage cheese into a strainer suspended over a bowl and allow it to drain for an hour. This is now required because the cottage cheese in today's market contains much more whey and cream than in the old days when this recipe was made. Mix all ingredients together and chill for several hours or overnight. YOU MAY NOT NEED ALL OF THE SEASONING MIX! ADD HALF OF IT AND MIX WELL. TASTE IT AND ADD MORE AS NEEDED! Serve as a condiment or as a dip. By the way, if you don't like caraway seeds, either leave them out or substitute with dill or fennel seeds, but it won't be the same.


Watch the video: The Alpine - Youniverse from the album There Is Only So Much You Can Do (May 2022).